Home > Evil, Libel > THE SMEAR CAMPAIGN—Hallmark of a Sociopath

THE SMEAR CAMPAIGN—Hallmark of a Sociopath

     Sanctuary for the Abused

Sociopath a.k.a. Anti-Social Personality Disorder or Psychopath

When you are under libelous attack by a person who has deceived and defrauded you, there is a possibility that the person is a sociopath. 
Sociopaths have no heart, no conscience, and no remorse. 
They will lie, cheat and steal from you and then tell everyone that it is all your fault.

See also: Slander Tactics
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  1. Abbri
    September 29, 2012 at 16:09

    The hardest thing for me in recovery has been dealing with the smear campaign. He has, and still is, telling outrageous lies about me to his family (including his 3 kids, who I was close to), our mutual friends, and others in our small town. I’m always wondering, when I run into someone he knows (he grew up in this town and I didn’t, so there are MANY people he knows), whether he has smeared me to them. I used to preemptively try and clear my name, but I’ve learned it’s just best to be friendly and let them figure him out for themselves. And if they don’t, or won’t, then they are not people I care to know anyway.

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    • Abbri
      September 29, 2012 at 16:10

      It’s gotten so bad that I’ve considered moving out of town; I still might.

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      • Disillusioned
        October 9, 2012 at 11:17

        I sympathize, totally. Each victim of this sort of abuse will respond differently, because each of us has unique circumstances and a unique emotional setup, which is the result of unique life experiences. That’s why advice such as “Don’t let it bother you.” or “Forget about it and move on.” may be well intended but not very helpful.

        The smear campaign is a vital part of reversing the appearance of who is the abuser and who is being abused. This role reversal tactic is used by all abusers because it is so effective (see DARVO). It diverts attention away from the abuse and onto the victim, who then is incriminated and, most likely, intimidated from speaking out.

        There is not one way out that suits all victims of abuse who are cornered in this manner. It is up to each of us to consider all aspects of all options—as best we can—before deciding on how to deal with the predicament that has been forced upon us.

        Being friendly toward people, including those who may have been negatively influenced about you, sounds good. You will gauge their reactions, and if they are positive, you may regain confidence and trust over time, and eventually regard the smear campaign as ancient history that no longer impacts your life.

        However, it depends on who you are and your unique circumstances if that is the right approach for you. If you must associate with people who are on “his side” and it causes you stress, depression, or anxiety; or if you are tortured by not knowing who holds a bias against you and who doesn’t, you will probably consider either isolating yourself or starting afresh in a different place.

        One of the bullies who abused me and spread malicious rumors stated that it was clear who wanted to “move on” and who didn’t, in other words criticizing me, their victim, because I did not quietly accept the mistreatment but asked for an explanation (which I never got.) Switching the appearance of abuser/abused is standard procedure for all abusers. The actions of the abuser are not mentioned so that all attention can be directed at the victim. Stripped of the context, the victim’s reactions appear to be unprovoked and inappropriate—as if out of the blue—with manipulated bystanders hopping on the bully’s bandwagon as a possible result.

        In my case, for example, anything I say or do will add to the notion that I am the one who “does not want to move on,” the one who “has issues,” the one who “is irrational;” deceptively seeming to validate the negative image of me spread by the bullies and making me look like the faulty party. Their idea of how I should “move on” is that I understand that they are more powerful, accept the pain and damage they have caused and the repulsive manner with which they went about it, shut up, and stay out of sight. That would suit their interests well, but not mine… My way of “moving on” is to pursue justice and hold the abusers accountable.

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  2. Abbri
    October 9, 2012 at 11:50

    “Stripped of the context, the victim’s reactions appear to be unprovoked and inappropriate—as if out of the blue—with manipulated bystanders hopping on the bully’s bandwagon as a possible result.”

    OMG yes, before I finally resolved to go NC all the way and blocked his calls and texts, he would text me nasty remarks to which I replied in the same vein. I later learned he’d shown the reply texts to others without showing the one’s he’d sent to me first, which were obviously meant just to goad me into responding so he could say “see, she won’t leave me alone, she’s stalking me”. I still haven’t gotten over my anger at this and everything else he’s done. Some days are better than others; today’s a bad one.

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  3. Disillusioned
    October 9, 2012 at 23:38

    Yes, it’s infuriating. It aggravates me immensely when evil doers pull off their devious malicious schemes and get away with it again and again; abusing others with impunity and without the slightest blemish on their “nice guy” public persona reputation. Victims find themselves framed in such a way that there is nothing they can do without making matters worse for themselves. Actually, there is something we can do to fight back and also regain a bit of dignity: we can blog. By exposing the bad guys and their evil ways, victims are supporting each other, spreading invaluable information to others, and hopefully shrinking the predators’ hunting ground.

    Check out the article at http://looking4mygps.blogspot.com/2012/10/the-smear-campaign-of-abuser-top-3.html. It is very good!

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  4. March 3, 2013 at 08:37

    I firmly believe in shedding light on the bully/abuser. My sister and I have blogs detailing the abuse we’ve suffered at the hands of — our own younger sister. And still experiencing at the present!
    She sent an anonymous letter to my job Nov. 2012, then on Jan. 22, 2013 admitted on the Huffington Post to doing it. We go to court in less than 2 weeks.
    meanwhile, I blog, I left several comments after hers on Huffington –
    click on my avatar to get to my blog – I will never stop exposing abuser’s dirty deeds

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  5. middlechild
    February 17, 2014 at 15:11

    Ruth, I have read some of your posts on other blogs and wholeheartedly sympathize with you and your sister in fighting back the betrayal your younger sister visited on you both. I too have a rotten sister, and came to the realization 5 yrs ago that she is a sociopath. She has all the usual traits and is great at lying, framing, truth-twisting, manipulation, scapegoating, backstabbing, etc. She also has the advantage of having our mother as her loyal protector and enabler. I went no contact with my sister once I knew what I was dealing with, but I believe she still smears me every chance she gets. The hardest part is not knowing (and not being able to ask people) what she has said about me behind my back. For instance, she recently went on a trip 1500 mi away from home to visit our Aunt and cousins. I am almost certain she used the opportunity to poison them against me. It sounds paranoid, but it is so hard not knowing what lies are being told about me to get everyone on her “team”. I can’t come out and ask them for fear of being labeled “paranoid”, and they would not likely tell me the truth anyway lest they get themselves tangled up in our battle. Unlike your sister, she hasn’t written a book so it’s not laid out for me like it was for you. In a small way you are lucky (as ludicrous as that sounds) because at least your sister’s slander and libel was exposed, so you are aware of how she portrayed you publicly, and you can battle her in the legal arena. In my case, I live in a different city so can only see the slander reflected in the eyes and demeanor of those I chance to meet on rare visits to my hometown. You are right that exposing the dirty deeds of these evil people is the only way to battle back, but my sister has all the advantages in our situation. She has access to lifelong family friends and I don’t. So all I can do is distance myself further from old friends and family and try to overcome the sadness and isolation I feel. It’s truly a helpless feeling and all you can do is give up. It’s hard for me because I’m not a quitter, but I really have no other choice the way I see it.

    You know what’s funny is that when I first read your story it was from your sister Joan’s perspective, and I actually thought she was the victim – that is, until I read much of your blog writings and came to the conclusion that it was she that must have been the perpetrator. The claims she made against you, your sister, spouses, etc. were just too outlandish to be believed. All I can say is she has one wild imagination!! But look at all the damage one disordered person can do to a family – she literally turned all of your lives upside down!! So sorry for what she has put you through and I commend you for fighting back any way you see fit. These types are family destroyers.

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  1. June 12, 2012 at 10:02
  2. June 23, 2012 at 18:35
  3. October 19, 2012 at 21:36
  4. March 23, 2013 at 13:02
  5. April 20, 2013 at 21:36

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